Fr. Ryan Richardson provides insight on forming a Catholic worldview

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By Ann-Marie Reasor, The Circuit

In a small, crowded room on Jan. 24, Fr. Ryan Richardson addressed the students of Benedictine College on an issue he deems extremely important.

“The Catholic Worldview: What is it and Why Does it Matter?”

Richardson spoke on four key points:

  • What is a worldview?
  • What are the dominate ‘secular’ worldviews?
  • 7 main aspects of a Catholic worldview
  • What ways can you form your own worldview?

His definition of worldview is the “lens through which we see the world.” Not all views are equal because one’s upbringing plays a part in how they view different aspects of the world.

His definition of a Catholic worldview “is the most perfect worldview” because it leads to fulfill who God is and who man is.

Before he listed the dominant ‘secular’ worldviews, Richardson stated that he doesn’t mean the term as demeaning, rather as an adjective for ‘worldly.’

He gave the names and definitions of these worldviews to the audience as follows:

  • Relativism: that there is an objective absolute moral truth.
  • Hedonism: everything is done for pleasure
  • Materialism: the only things that really exist is what we can see or measure
  • Atheism: that there is no God
  • Linked Practical Atheism: living like there is really not a God. “This is more dangerous than Atheism,” he said. “This is the greatest challenge of our time.”
  • Deism: God made the world, but then set it loose; He is not interested in ‘me’ personally
  • Agnosticism: there could be a God, but we’re not sure, so why bother?

Richardson said that in order to counteract these secular views, it’s important to look at the reigning Catholic worldviews.

  • God exists
  • God is love
  • God has a plan for your life
  • Heaven is real
  • Sin is also all too real
  • God became man, in Christ, to free us from sin
  • We are called to evangelize

Richardson then posed the question, “how can we develop a Catholic worldview?”

Richardson explained that if you want to evangelize– if you want to gain a good, holy worldview– you have to treat your relationship with God as you would classes, or even as you would a relationship with a spouse, best friend or significant other.

“Prayer is intimate,” he said. “It is how we converse with God. It is how we spend time with Him.”

Richardson asked, how else would you get to know someone’s dreams and expectations if you don’t spend quality time with them?

He left the students with a challenge, “Treat your faith life with at least as much importance as you would classes.”